Get Some Social Media Savvy – Part 2

 

 

 

Get Some Social Media Savvy- Part Two

A 3-Step Guide to Developing a Manageable Social Media Strategy

Holly Biondo, Net Driven

 

In Part 1 of our 3-part series we discussed setting up your Facebook business page. Before you start posting, there are a few things you need to do in order to make sure you’re maximizing both your resources and your impact.

The first thing you need to do is set some goals. The plan is to use your Facebook page to impact your business (build awareness, attract new customers, etc.), so as with any other business tactic, you need to set goals to have something to measure and help formulate a strategy. When you make a decision to invest in any other form of marketing, you set a budget and a timeline, and you decide specifically what type of results you’re looking for. Social media is no different.

What kind of goals should you set for your business Facebook page? We recommend S.M.A.R.T. goals. This means that your goals need to be Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time Based.

Specific– Your goals should be simple, clear, and defined. For example, instead of just saying “my goal is to generate new customers on Facebook”, set a specific goal of generating 2 new customers in the next 30 days. Instead of saying “my goal is to get more customers from surrounding towns” you could set a goal of achieving 5 new sales from customers in a specific zip code in the next 60 days.

Measurable– How do you effectively measure reaching more customers? You could say that, generally speaking, you’ve reached more customers because people have mentioned finding you on Facebook, but how many? How long did it take to reach them? It’s much easier to measure whether or not you reached 2 new customers in 30 days, isn’t it? You wouldn’t just open your shop in the morning and say “my goal is to make money”, you have specific revenue targets to meet in order to stay in business, right? How do you measure your goals on Facebook? Facebook insights! We’ll dive into this in Part 3, but just know that Facebook makes it easy to see if you’re hitting your goals.

Attainable- When you set your goals, don’t aim too high. Your goals should be short-term and realistic. Sure, we would all love to get 10,000 Facebook page likes in 30 days, but is this realistic? You could employ some kind of tactic that would force people to like your page in order to receive something or enter a contest, but are these likes really valuable? Are these people likely to become customers, or are they just going to unlike your page after the contest has ended? Setting unrealistic and unachievable goals is a good way to set yourself up for failure and burn you out quickly. Set smaller, more achievable goals that you can easily attain and you’ll be seeing results in no time!

Relevant- This one should be a no-brainer. Your goals should be relevant to your overall business objectives and your other marketing initiatives. Maybe you have a big rebate promotion coming up. Set a goal of generating 500 impressions on an ad promoting your rebate. Maybe you’ve set a business objective to increase appointments for brake service in the next 6 months. Set a goal of reaching 10 new customers in need of brake repair in your town in the next 90 days with a specific ad or post.

Time Based- Your goals should always be time based. Time based goals create a sense of urgency and increase the odds that you will work to attain them. If you set a goal of reaching 10 new customers in need of brake repair in a specific zip code but put no timeframe in place, what’s going to motivate you to come up with ways to do so? There will always be something else that comes up and you’ll never achieve your goal. Maybe you will achieve your goal, but you do it in one year because your focus was elsewhere. This is a goal that you could’ve achieved in 90 days had you added this to your goal and set some ideas into motion for 30, 60, and 90 days.

Now that you know how to set S.M.A.R.T. goals, it’s time to come up with some of your own! We suggest starting small. Set one or two goals for the first few months and work up from there.

The second thing you need to do in this phase is to understand what to post and what not to post. Here are some quick tips on posting to your new Facebook page.

DO:

  • Be genuine and personable.
  • Post pictures of your shop, your staff, and your customers. People love seeing other people and finding businesses that they can get to know. Giving people faces to remember makes it easier for them to want to visit your shop.
  • Share updates on specials and promotions, just don’t let it be all that you post.
  • Ask your Facebook followers to share your page and your posts. Facebook makes it difficult to get visibility, so this can help a great deal.
  • Come up with a posting schedule. Aim for 1-2 posts per week to start, and if you’re getting a positive reaction, increase it a little (but not too much). Facebook insights allows you to see what times of day your page followers are on Facebook, which makes it easy to determine the best times to post.
  • Be consistent. Posting three times in one week and then abandoning your page for the next two months isn’t going to have a good result. Consistency is key.
  • Make your posts open ended or ask questions. Try to engage people and allow them to interact with your business. Social media is a two-way street.
  • Post pictures and videos. Multimedia posts perform way better than plain text or links.

DON’T:

  • Avoid being overly salesy. It’s ok to post about promotions; just don’t let that be all you post about.
  • Avoid anything political or offensive at all costs. No explanation needed.
  • Don’t post too often. Businesses that post every day or multiple times per day do not necessarily have a greater impact. People can get very tired of this and end up unliking your page.
  • Don’t be slow to respond when people send messages or comment on a post.
  • Don’t post irrelevant content just for the sake of posting.
  • Don’t write in all caps. People don’t like to be yelled at, whether in person or on social.
  • Don’t post low-quality images. All images you post should be high-quality and look professional.

We hope you found Part 2 of our series informative and inspiring. Stay tuned for Part 3, where we’ll discuss Facebook advertising, promoting posts, and measuring your results.

 

 

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Written by ASA-Midwest

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